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I know that to sustain these true moments of insight, one has to be highly disciplined, lead a disciplined life.

Henry Miller

Design [is] the emerging ethos formulating and then answering a very new question: What shall we do now, in the face of the chaos that we have created?

John Hockenberry (via shoutsandmumbles)

The BlackBerry Passport Reviews →

parislemon:

Certainly doesn’t sound like the absolute worst device is the world, but certainly nothing that will save BlackBerry. A solid C-/D+. 

I’m perplexed by the design choice here. Yes, it’s the shape of a passport, but why is that a good thing? No one types on their passport. No one reads things on their passport. It looks as if BlackBerry made it different simply for the sake of being different.

Yes, it sounds like the large, square screen makes it mildly easier to read email and documents. But the shape also makes it harder to type, negating any positives of the screen. And it’s arguably net negative given BlackBerry users love of their keyboards. 

I would have gone the other way — either way. I would have either made a device that’s the ultimate one-handed use machine (especially since Apple is going in the other direction with the iPhone 6/6 Plus). Or made the thing bigger, with the best physical “thumb” keyboard on a phone ever.

Maybe John Chen is reading this right now.

Ello is a free, user-supported open social publishing platform.

via bruces, who commented,

A social Media platform even more wet, soft-hearted and gooey than Tumblr

*I didn’t know that was possible,

The problem isn’t coming up with ideas, it is how to contain the invasion. My ideas are like uninvited guests. They don’t knock on the door; they climb in through the windows like burglars who show up in the middle of the night and make a racket in the kitchen as they raid the fridge. I don’t sit and ponder which one I should deal with first. The one to be wrestled to the floor before all others is the one coming at me with the most vehemence.

Werner Herzog, A Guide for the Perplexed

Self-Healing Asphalt

via Laura Bliss, Scientists Are Inventing Roads That Can Repair Themselves

As TripNet reported last year, more than one-quarter of major urban roads in the U.S.—Interstates, freeways and other arteries—have pavement insubstandard shape. Heavy with potholes and tears, these rough-riding roads incur the average American driver $377 annually—$80 billion nationally—in operating and repair costs. And a recent estimate from the American Society of Civil Engineers shows that combined, the economic losses of decaying roads, bridges, and other infrastructure zaps $129 billion per year from federal coffers.  

Clearly, we need to mix better asphalt—stronger asphalt, less costly to repair.

Which is what Erik Schlangen has done. Simply by mixing in strands of steel wool to asphalt’s usual combination of pebbles and bitumen, the Dutch civil engineer at Delft University has successfully created a road-ready material that’s practically self-healing. As he puts it, it heals itself “with a little bit of help from the outside.”

In the video of his TED talk, you can watch Dr. Schlangen demonstrate his miracle asphalt onstage: In front of an audience of undergrads, he karate-chops a block of asphalt into two. As he begins to talk about how nice it is to drive on asphalt, he places the two pieces side-by-side in an industrial microwave.

That’s the trick: It’s induction that heals the asphalt. The microwave heats the steel wool, which in turn melts and mixes the sticky bitumen around it. Take the heat away, and the bitumen cools, mending the asphalt as it goes.

When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.

Arthur C. Clarke, Hazards of Prophecy

This is Clarke’s Law

Another proof that 2005 was the start of the postnormal era: 

Businesses and consumers will add roughly 40 exaflops of computing capacity in 2014, up from 5 in 2008 and less than 1 in 2005. - McKinsey

The most important metric now is exoflops. Future currencies will be based on the cost of computing cycles.

Another proof that 2005 was the start of the postnormal era: 

Businesses and consumers will add roughly 40 exaflops of computing capacity in 2014, up from 5 in 2008 and less than 1 in 2005. - McKinsey

The most important metric now is exoflops. Future currencies will be based on the cost of computing cycles.

It is easier to imagine the end of the world than to imagine the end of capitalism.

Frederic Jameson, Future City 


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