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Posts tagged with ‘design’


Forebruary is a wall calendar that you do not need to replace every year. The movable frame above the surface contains the month needed.
- Ilya Birman

Forebruary is a wall calendar that you do not need to replace every year. The movable frame above the surface contains the month needed.

- Ilya Birman

A radical breakthrough in engine design:

Jason Cammisa, No crankshaft, no problem: Toyota’s free piston engine is brilliant
Electrically driven cars are the future. But until we have cheap, 1000-mile batteries, we still need range-extending fossil-fuel engines. Those devices don’t need to turn wheels, just generate juice. The simple solution is to strap a generator to a piston engine, as BMW did with the two-cylinder range extender in its i3 EV. But if the engine never turns a wheel, there’s no need for it to rotate anything. Why not cut out the middleman and use the piston’s reciprocating motion to generate electricity? That obviates camshafts and most other rotating parts, too.
Toyota recently showed a prototype engine that does just that. It’s called the Free Piston Engine Linear Generator (FPEG). “Free” refers to the fact that the piston isn’t attached to a crankshaft; instead, as the piston is forced downward during its power stroke, it passes through windings in the cylinder to generate a burst of three-phase AC electricity. The FPEG operates like a two-stroke engine but adds direct gasoline injection and electrically operated valves. It can also be run like a diesel, using compression rather than a spark plug to ignite its fuel mixture.
Toyota says this mechanically simple engine achieves a claimed thermal-efficiency rating of 42 percent in continuous use. Only the best, most complicated, and most expensive of today’s gas engines can come close to that number, and only in specific circumstances.

A radical breakthrough in engine design:

Jason Cammisa, No crankshaft, no problem: Toyota’s free piston engine is brilliant

Electrically driven cars are the future. But until we have cheap, 1000-mile batteries, we still need range-extending fossil-fuel engines. Those devices don’t need to turn wheels, just generate juice. The simple solution is to strap a generator to a piston engine, as BMW did with the two-cylinder range extender in its i3 EV. But if the engine never turns a wheel, there’s no need for it to rotate anything. Why not cut out the middleman and use the piston’s reciprocating motion to generate electricity? That obviates camshafts and most other rotating parts, too.

Toyota recently showed a prototype engine that does just that. It’s called the Free Piston Engine Linear Generator (FPEG). “Free” refers to the fact that the piston isn’t attached to a crankshaft; instead, as the piston is forced downward during its power stroke, it passes through windings in the cylinder to generate a burst of three-phase AC electricity. The FPEG operates like a two-stroke engine but adds direct gasoline injection and electrically operated valves. It can also be run like a diesel, using compression rather than a spark plug to ignite its fuel mixture.

Toyota says this mechanically simple engine achieves a claimed thermal-efficiency rating of 42 percent in continuous use. Only the best, most complicated, and most expensive of today’s gas engines can come close to that number, and only in specific circumstances.

(via alexanderpf)

Confusion and clutter are the failure of design, not the attributes of information.

Edward Tufte

(Source: maxistentialist, via emergentfutures)

(via StorkStand: The Most Affordable, Mobile Standing Desk by Mike Goldberg)

Very clever design.

James S.H. Lee’s paperclip armrest, designed in 2009, still is not in use.

Good design accelerates the adoption of new ideas.

Yves Béhar

hajohinta:

Evolution Door

(via brucesterling)

Traditional workplace design has a tendency to overvalue the meeting and undervalue the discussion .

Denise Mieko Cherry via

When people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong.

Neil Gaiman

(Source: bokardo.com, via femmebot)

via Woont

The table lamp Light Drops Big was developed by the design agency e27 Berlin and produced in cooperation with the manufacturer Pulpo. This is a lamp in a vintage design, which has modern attributes during processing. The table lamp Light Drops are available in two different size versions, Light Drops Small and Light Drops Big, the latter has a diameter of 32 cm and a height of 14 cm. The body is made of glass and is smoke in the colors gray, turquoise or purple commercially available. This special glass case is made and mouth-blown by hand.

The top of the table lamp is perforated and can be optionally selected in shiny copper or powder coated metal in white-gray. By perforating the copper or metal lid, the light falls in a very special manner on the environment in which the lamp is located. Due to the vintage look of the table lamp Light Drops Big this is easy to combine with all kinds of interior styles. The base of the lamp is encased in cork and the electric cable with gray fabric. The table lamp was designed in 2013 and first produced, and is nominated for the German Design Award 2014.

With modern displays, people don’t need as much ambient light in the workplace, although most offices are still oppressively bright, seeming more like dorms, hospitals, or bus stations than a place of contemplation, or calm interaction. I bet we will see a transition to offices more like libraries, or quiet cafés. And of course, modern research demonstrates that people are much more creative when the lights are turned down.

Those are a few of the reasons that I admire the design sensibilities of the Light Drops lamps from e27 Berlin.

Also, this incorporate the new rejection of stainless steel and the fascination with copper and matte, powdered metals: the decline of industrial aesthetics in the postnormal.