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Posts tagged with ‘water’

The Namib Desert beetle lives in an area that only gets half an inch of rainfall per year, and so it draws 12 percent of its weight in water from the air to quench its thirst. NBD Nano co-founder Deckard Sorensen was inspired by the beetle to the point that he created a self-filling water bottle, which he hopes to bring to the market by 2014.
(via Inspired by a beetle that draws water from the air, scientist creates self-filling water bottle prototype - The Next Web)

The Namib Desert beetle lives in an area that only gets half an inch of rainfall per year, and so it draws 12 percent of its weight in water from the air to quench its thirst. NBD Nano co-founder Deckard Sorensen was inspired by the beetle to the point that he created a self-filling water bottle, which he hopes to bring to the market by 2014.

(via Inspired by a beetle that draws water from the air, scientist creates self-filling water bottle prototype - The Next Web)

Everything We Think We Know About People Is Wrong - Stowe Boyd  →

The result of a great deal of cognitive science research demonstrates that people don’t really understand how we think, how we influence each other, and the degree to which we are connected. We also lack an understanding of water, which is the most common liquid on Earth:

Everything We Think We Know About People Is Wrong - Stowe Boyd via Nexalogy blog:

[…] It turns out that people — and marketers — don’t really understand influence very well, despite being embedded in social networks their entire lives: we really don’t understand the way that we are influenced by other people. For example, if someone touches you when you first meet, you are ten times more likely to remember that person. But we are unaware, later, that the touch was the reason for our recollection. We underestimate the impact of a kind word, or the chilling effects of workplace fear. There are dozens of examples of this sort coming out of cognitive science that demonstrate that we are being strongly influenced below the conscious level, physiologically, all the time. The actions of others can make us fearful, or confident, or curious, or suspicious — and it can happen invisibly. People just don’t have a great insight into the social interactions of people, despite being involved in them. Most contemporary thinking about our social interactions is derived from an economic view that considers groups as collections of individuals, where each individual makes more-or-less rational decisions intended to maximize benefits to themselves and their loved ones. I think there is a analogy with the historical physics view of how fluids work, like water, or water specifically.

read more at Nexalogy blog

Due to rising population, coupled with increasing demands by the agriculture and energy industries (often referred to as the water-food-energy nexus), global demand for clean water will outstrip supply by an average of 40 percent by 2030. While this reality poses grave risks to thousands of communities, it is also the driver of a daunting, and often confusing, economic dilemma which businesses must prepare for. It’s time for companies operating in the many dry regions around the world to equip themselves with the tools and mindset they need to navigate this new normal.

Excerpt from a worrisome new McKinsey report [PDF] charting the future of water

(via curiositycounts)

(via curiositycounts)


WATER WASTED:
More than 37,800 liters of  water is lost via leakage every minute as it flows through New York  State’s aqueducts into the city, according to IBM. The wall visualizes a  calculation of that volume of water corresponding to the volume of the  data wall. “Essentially we’re filling the wall with digital water,”  IBM’s Lee Green, vice president of brand experience and strategic  design, explains.

(via Sensors and the City: IBM Exhibit Visualizes Today’s Urban Problems—and Potential Solutions)

WATER WASTED:

More than 37,800 liters of water is lost via leakage every minute as it flows through New York State’s aqueducts into the city, according to IBM. The wall visualizes a calculation of that volume of water corresponding to the volume of the data wall. “Essentially we’re filling the wall with digital water,” IBM’s Lee Green, vice president of brand experience and strategic design, explains.

(via Sensors and the City: IBM Exhibit Visualizes Today’s Urban Problems—and Potential Solutions)


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