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Posts tagged with ‘urbanism’

thisbigcity:

That rise in transit ridership outpaced a 20 percent growth in population and a 23 percent increase in vehicle miles traveled over the same time period. 

The future of transport is obvious, but our governments continue to overinvest in highways, because of overestimates of highway use by the US DOT:

thisbigcity:

That rise in transit ridership outpaced a 20 percent growth in population and a 23 percent increase in vehicle miles traveled over the same time period. 

The future of transport is obvious, but our governments continue to overinvest in highways, because of overestimates of highway use by the US DOT:

humanscalecities:

| City | Data | Future | exhibition
24th September 2014 – 7th October 2014
Exhibition 24th September – 7th October 2014
Symposium Thursday 25th September 2014.
Venue Telecom Italia Future Centre in Venice, Italy.1
The UrbanIxD project takes the view that cities in the future will contain a complex mesh of interconnected, heterogeneous technological systems. Technology will continue to evolve, and the data-reading and writing capabilites of cities will only increase, but mess and complexity will still be the background context.
The focus of the emergent field of Urban Interaction Design is public space and the relationships between people – with and through technology2. The currency of these interactions is data. Making sense of this data, and making it meaningful, transparent, useful and enjoyable is a challenge for interaction design.
The | City | Data | Future | exhibition speculates about the possible futures that city inhabitants might experience.
UrbanIxD

humanscalecities:

| City | Data | Future | exhibition

24th September 2014 – 7th October 2014

Exhibition 24th September – 7th October 2014

Symposium Thursday 25th September 2014.

Venue Telecom Italia Future Centre in Venice, Italy.1

The UrbanIxD project takes the view that cities in the future will contain a complex mesh of interconnected, heterogeneous technological systems. Technology will continue to evolve, and the data-reading and writing capabilites of cities will only increase, but mess and complexity will still be the background context.

The focus of the emergent field of Urban Interaction Design is public space and the relationships between people – with and through technology2. The currency of these interactions is data. Making sense of this data, and making it meaningful, transparent, useful and enjoyable is a challenge for interaction design.

The | City | Data | Future | exhibition speculates about the possible futures that city inhabitants might experience.

UrbanIxD

humanscalecities:

Urban data: From fetish object to social object
image by Robin Howie 
We don’t make cities in order to make buildings and infrastructure. We make cities in order to come together, to create wealth, culture, more people.
…urban networks in the contemporary city are largely hidden, opaque, invisible, disappearing underground, locked into pipes, cables, conduits, tubes, passages and electronic waves. It is exactly this hidden form that renders the tense relationship between nature and the city blurred, that contributes to severing the process of social transformation of nature from the process of urbanization. Perhaps more importantly, the hidden flows and their technological framing render occult the social relations and power mechanisms that are scripted in and enacted through these flows. However, urban networks have not always been opaque. […] In particular, during the early stages of nineteenth-century modernization, urban networks and their connecting iconic landmarks were prominently visual and present […] When the urban became constructed as agglomerated use values that turned the city into a theatre of accumulation and economic growth, urban networks became the iconic embodiments of and shrines to a technologically scripted image and practice of progress. Once completed, the networks became buried underground, invisible, rendered banal and relegated to an apparently marginal, subterranean urban underworld.

Kaika and Swyngedouw, in the deliciously titled “Fetishizing the Modern City: The Phantasmagoria of Urban Technological Networks" (2000)

(Source: textbookmaneuver, via adhocratic)


The Cascade
Created by Edge Design Institute, a monolithic structure in Central Hong Kong was transformed from a public staircase into a communal seating area with gardening features, giving extra meaning to a neglected and overlooked, urban space. (via Eight Imaginative Projects Reusing Infrastructure in Cities | This Big City)

The Cascade

Created by Edge Design Institute, a monolithic structure in Central Hong Kong was transformed from a public staircase into a communal seating area with gardening features, giving extra meaning to a neglected and overlooked, urban space. (via Eight Imaginative Projects Reusing Infrastructure in Cities | This Big City)

Though [architect John] Tolva has compared Facebook with suburbia (“a gated network of affinity that disallows chance encounters”), and Twitter with an urban street (“all about non-reciprocal engagement and diversity”), claiming that these online ‘spaces’ could learn from urbanism, he is far more concerned with the overlap between physical and digital placemaking, citing apps like Foursquare which encourage “place-based serendipity.”

The best way to develop this kind of serendipity is not necessarily through apps and personal devices, however, but through the “layering of technology into the environment.” This will ensure that new technologies have the broadest impact possible and will not just be limited to people who go out of their way to use them.

But who should be overseeing this integration, suggesting how the digital can be overlaid on to the spatial? Tolva sees this as the responsibility of urban designers:

“I do think there is a role for this kind of training in architecture and urban planning schools. We need to move away from thinking of technology solely as a tool to make the built world. It is a material now and should be designed and shaped the way we do walls and streets.

In every detail a city should reflect that human beings are sacred and that they are equal.

Enrique Peñalosa, cited by Sarah Goodyear in Looking for Equality in Public Spaces

(via beaconstreets)

Disruptions: How Driverless Cars Could Reshape Cities - Nick Bilton →

I wish journalists would talk to futurists when waving their hands about the future. Here’s a piece about the future of cities via-a-vis driverless cars that does not even try to correlate this trend with other salient ones, like millenenials’ dislike of cars, the first ever decrease in driving, and the hollowing out of suburbia. As a result, this piece is all over the place. And note that the sources I am using are often the NY Times itself, where Bilton works.

Nick Bilton, Disruptions: How Driverless Cars Could Reshape Cities

As scientists and car companies forge ahead — many expect self-driving cars to become commonplace in the next decade — researchers, city planners and engineers are contemplating how city spaces could change if our cars start doing the driving for us. There are risks, of course: People might be more open to a longer daily commute, leading to even more urban sprawl.

That city of the future could have narrower streets because parking spots would no longer be necessary. And the air would be cleaner because people would drive less. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration30 percent of driving in business districts is spent in a hunt for a parking spot, and the agency estimates that almost one billion miles of driving is wasted that way every year.

“What automation is going to allow is repurposing, both of spaces in cities, and of the car itself,” said Ryan Calo, an assistant professor at the University of Washington School of Law, who specializes in robotics and drones.

Harvard University researchers note that as much as one-third of the land in some cities is devoted to parking spots. Some city planners expect that the cost of homes will fall as more space will become available in cities. If parking on city streets is reduced and other vehicles on roadways become smaller, homes and offices will take up that space.

It is more likely that available roadway space — once parking on the margins is less necessary — would be repurposed as walkable shared roads and urban green space. Especially since the driverless cars would be programmed to drive at 10 miles per hour in such areas, and would do a better job at avoiding a child chasing a ball in the street.

Parking lots could be repurposed, yes, and many of those might be converted into homes and offices, and yes, that might decrease housing costs somewhat, although the urban surge is still going.

Again, the current population trend in the US is a migration of the young and affluent into denser urban settings, and the displacement of less affluent people into near suburbia, and the collapse of exurbia (See Michael Frey’s Population Growth in Metro America Since 1980: Putting the Volatile 2000s in Perspective, for real stats on demographic change and migration to the cities). Even if people could ride a bicycle in the back of a driverless van commuting to some distant exurb from a downtown job, the reality is no one wants to live out there anymore. 

The biggest trend missing here is the likely increase in municipally-managed cars in a driverless world: a massive car share service. People could dispense with car ownership, and the costs of relying on the equivalent of driverless taxis would plummet, since there will be no hacks driving the cars.

Post-Sandy: What Is The Future Of Urban Development In NYC?

What sort of changes in planning should we expect for New York City following Hurricane Sandy? Buildings with higher foundations, electrical systems moved from the basement to above the first floor, and watertight first floor doorways. But no retreat from the water’s edge is likely, in the near term.

New York Reassessing Building Code to Limit Storm Damage - Mireya Navarro

Some architects and building experts say the city should widen its efforts to plant more wetlands and parks that can serve as natural buffers to floods. “All the little blades of grass actually makes the flow of the water lower,” said Susannah C. Drake, associate director of the Cooper Union Institute for Sustainable Design and the principal architect at dlandstudio.

image

dladnstudio and ARO exhibition: New Urban Ground

What does not seem to be getting consideration, at least for now, is banning development altogether in the city’s flood zones, humble or affluent.

“This is not a viable policy option in New York City, and to be honest, nor is it in any other major coastal city I’ve been working,” said Jeroen Aerts, a water risk expert from the Free University in Amsterdam who has been hired by the mayor’s office to assess flood protections. “The stakes of developers and general economic activities in the waterfront are too high.”

In Mr. Aerts’s view, the most realistic options for New York are to build levees and surge barriers, and elevate and floodproof buildings.

Ms. Quinn, a likely candidate for mayor when Mr. Bloomberg’s term expires at the end of 2013, said changes in the building code were a far higher priority than rethinking zoning rules. But she said that nothing was off the table.

“I don’t think there’s anything that’s taboo to discuss at this point,” she said.

We’ll see what happens after the next storm leads to $30B in damages.

(via underpaidgenius)