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Posts tagged with ‘social TV’

(via Five years of cord-cutting at Time Warner Cable in a single chart - Quartz)

I’m vindicated by this chart, and I hope the folks that said cord-cutting wasn’t going to happen when I wrote the Social TV and the Second Screen report a few years will now publicly admit they were wrong.

(via Five years of cord-cutting at Time Warner Cable in a single chart - Quartz)

I’m vindicated by this chart, and I hope the folks that said cord-cutting wasn’t going to happen when I wrote the Social TV and the Second Screen report a few years will now publicly admit they were wrong.

Shazam For Clothes Identifies What TV Characters Are Wearing - PSFK →

CEO Andrew Fisher told The Guardian: We have the ability to identify the product in a TV show so that when somebody Shazams it, they could find out where a presenter’s dress is from in one click.

No big surprise. I predicted this — as did oters — and wrote about it in Social TV and the Second Screen, last year.

screengeek:

85% of smartphone users reported second screen-linked behavior at least once a month, over 60% reported doing it on a weekly basis, and 39% did so daily. Over 80% of 18- to 24-year-olds told Pew they used their phone while watching TV, and 60% of Americans with annual incomes above $50,000 use their phones while watching TV.Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/bii-report-why-the-second-screen-industry-is-set-to-explode-2013-2#ixzz2MQvo3Wdn

screengeek:

85% of smartphone users reported second screen-linked behavior at least once a month, over 60% reported doing it on a weekly basis, and 39% did so daily. Over 80% of 18- to 24-year-olds told Pew they used their phone while watching TV, and 60% of Americans with annual incomes above $50,000 use their phones while watching TV.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/bii-report-why-the-second-screen-industry-is-set-to-explode-2013-2#ixzz2MQvo3Wdn

(via designersofthings)

kdnewman:

Visual SyncAR breaks the fourth wall, brings TV content into your living room

Visual SyncAR, from NTT, uses digital watermarks embedded in the video stream to display synchronized content on a second screen. The screen area and playback timing is quickly detected, allowing for CG overlays and contextual information to be displayed with precision.

(by Diginfonews)

I predicted this technology last year in the Social TV and the Second Screen report.

(via kdnewman)

When I go into my living room and turn on the TV, I feel like I have gone backwards in time by 20 to 30 years. It’s an area of intense interest. I can’t say more than that.

Tim Cook, to NBC News’ Brian Williams.

Yeah, that’s about as close to a confirmation of the project as you’re going to get out of Apple…

(via parislemon)

Viggle And GetGlue Maybe Getting Glued?

Reports of Viggle’s acquisition of GetGlue might be a bit hasy, since the deal between the two social TV players is contingent on Viggle raising an additional $60M in financing.

Viggle buys GetGlue in social TV consolidation play - The AppSide

Viggle’s latest financials report reveals that in the year to 30 June 2012 its revenues were $1.7m, while its net losses were $96.5m.

$100M to build a social TV application? What are they doing with all that money? It’s preposterous. That’s more than MySpace burned through in the last year, and I thought they had set the bar.

I think the reality is that people are more likely to simply continue using Twitter or Facebook when watching TV instead of switching to a specialized app. 

Nielsen’s new Connected Devices study is out:

Social Media — 44% of 18-24 year olds and close to 50% of 25-34 year olds are visiting social networking sites on their smartphones during both commercials and programs while watching TV.
Seeking Information — 36% of people 35-54 and 44% of people 55-64 use their tablets to dive deeper into the TV program they are currently watching.

So the older folks are relying on search to make their experience of TV richer, while the youths are relying on each other.

Nielsen’s new Connected Devices study is out:

  • Social Media — 44% of 18-24 year olds and close to 50% of 25-34 year olds are visiting social networking sites on their smartphones during both commercials and programs while watching TV.
  • Seeking Information — 36% of people 35-54 and 44% of people 55-64 use their tablets to dive deeper into the TV program they are currently watching.

So the older folks are relying on search to make their experience of TV richer, while the youths are relying on each other.

What Are People Doing On The Second Screen?

There’s a torrent of new research coming out about the second screen, and how rapidly we are moving from Old TV to New TV, as I detailed in the recent Social TV And The Second Screen report.

The numbers of people second screening is rising quickly, as shown in this eMarketer study:

Consumers Create Own Social TV Experiences - eMarketer

The study also found that around 41% of respondents were interested in or were already using websites and apps that allowed them to chat with others about TV shows. Of those respondents, 56% said that, if their favorite TV show launched a social TV app, they would be interested in a chat function directly through that app, while 53% would prefer to use Facebook chat. Half of respondents would use text messaging or group texting and 38% said they would use Skype to discuss that TV show.

Looking at when viewers are participating in these social TV activities, it depends on the type of content or activity. Checking in to a show, through an app such as GetGlue, generally happens before or during a show, while searching for extra information or playing games most often takes place during ad breaks or after the show.

This write up never mentions Twitter, which seems a strange omission.

(via worktalkresearch)

Social TV And The Second Screen Special Report In The Press

Joe McKendrick reviews the Social TV and The Second Screen special report for Smart Planet (Social TV fuels race for ’second screen’ dominance: 13 disruptive companies):

Not too long ago, consumers had one screen in front of them at a time, and it was either a PC, or a standard television set. Now, consumers are surrounded by a “swarm of devices” that are increasingly interacting and overlapping one another. Lately, tablets have been the device of choice serving as the second screen of choice, and the race is on to capture big pieces of this vast new real estate.

That’s the gist of a new report by Stowe Boyd of Work Talk Research. He refers to the trend as “second screening,” but it means a lot more than simply having another screen present while watching television. It opens up a new era of interaction — the rise of “Social TV.” This Internet-TV convergence now taking place has implications for a range of industries, from broadcasting to content delivery to advertising.

To download the special report, click here.

(Source: worktalkresearch)

Lean Back 2.0 Reviews ‘Social TV And The Second Screen’

Emma Gardner contributes to Lean Back 2.0, and talks about the fact that TV users are participating in lean forward and lean back behvaviors at the same time with the New TV model I discussed in the recently released Social TV And The Second Screen special report.

New report on ‘Social TV and The Second Screen’, Emma Gardner

The report finds that TV viewers are “increasingly likely to be using multiple devices at the same time. For example, watching a conventional TV screen while texting a friend on mobile phone, or discussing the show or game with friends on Facebook.” Boyd asserts that TV is becoming less like a main stage, and more like a backdrop for people to engage in social interaction. 

As TV viewing habits change, so will advertising. Boyd believes that the days of the 30-second TV commercial are nearing an end:

“New advertising models — ones that are much more aligned with web advertising models — are already emerging on the second screen, and these will lead to a rapid decrease in the profitability of the Old TV model as ads playing on the dumb TV device are displaced by ads and other forms of participative sponsorship on the second screen: on users’ smart phones and tablets.”

When I recently spoke with Annette King, chief executive at OgilvyOne UK, she reiterated this shift toward second-screen advertising, offering a tangible (and delicious) example. Let’s say that Jamie Oliver is making a special truffle recipe on his television show. King imagined an ad where you might “use your tablet to find out where truffles grow in the world or how to make Jamie’s recipe.” 

This intersection of leaning forward and leaning back might have profound implications for the publishing industry. Could magazine apps start to complement TV shows? I could imagine a travel magazine partnering with the Travel channel to offer viewers articles and trip recommendations. I’d certainly watch Anthony Bourdain travel to Lisbon while simultaneously looking up the best Lisbon eateries on my Travel and Leisure iPad app. 

I think King is onto something: we will see these new synergies, and the connecting of print media with the user experience of social TV, and cooking and travel are delicious places where this will happen soon.

(Source: worktalkresearch)