Elsewhere

Amazon is making a play to be the second screen with their new Kindles, which include a Chromecast-like control of content on your Samsung or Playstation 3 or 4, as well as offline viewing of Prime Instant movies and videos.

Brian Heater, Amazon’s Fire OS 3.0 ‘Mojito’ arrives just in time for those new tablets
Second Screen is Amazon’s big push to get people to use their Fires in front of their TVs. The feature “flings” content to your set, by way of your PlayStation 3 / 4 or Samsung smart TV. More content partners are coming, as well. When we asked specifically about Chromecast, we just got a “stay tuned,” however. The content itself isn’t actually streamed from the tablet. Instead, the set is pulling it down from the cloud, but you can still use your Fire to control it. Once the content is flung, you’ll get contextual information by way of X-Ray, which now also features the names of songs that are playing (which, naturally, you can then purchase through Amazon), character names and trivia from Amazon’s IMDb service. Speaking of X-Ray, 3.0 brings X-Ray Music, which features lyrics licensed (not crowdsourced, mind) by Amazon. You’ll be able to see them whether or not you’re online. (via Amazon’s Fire OS 3.0 ‘Mojito’ arrives just in time for those new tablets)

No reassuring words about support for the Chromecast device, or a Kindle equivalent, just a ‘stay tuned’. Grrr.

Amazon is making a play to be the second screen with their new Kindles, which include a Chromecast-like control of content on your Samsung or Playstation 3 or 4, as well as offline viewing of Prime Instant movies and videos.

Brian Heater, Amazon’s Fire OS 3.0 ‘Mojito’ arrives just in time for those new tablets

Second Screen is Amazon’s big push to get people to use their Fires in front of their TVs. The feature “flings” content to your set, by way of your PlayStation 3 / 4 or Samsung smart TV. More content partners are coming, as well. When we asked specifically about Chromecast, we just got a “stay tuned,” however. The content itself isn’t actually streamed from the tablet. Instead, the set is pulling it down from the cloud, but you can still use your Fire to control it. Once the content is flung, you’ll get contextual information by way of X-Ray, which now also features the names of songs that are playing (which, naturally, you can then purchase through Amazon), character names and trivia from Amazon’s IMDb service. Speaking of X-Ray, 3.0 brings X-Ray Music, which features lyrics licensed (not crowdsourced, mind) by Amazon. You’ll be able to see them whether or not you’re online. (via Amazon’s Fire OS 3.0 ‘Mojito’ arrives just in time for those new tablets)

No reassuring words about support for the Chromecast device, or a Kindle equivalent, just a ‘stay tuned’. Grrr.

App: The First Second Screen Film

Second screen comes to the movies with an app-enabled film, appropiately named APP.  The film is about a young psychology student Anna Rijnders who, after a dramatic accident in which her ​​younger brother has become partially paralyzed, goes completely into her own virtual world. 
Before going to see the film, moviegoers are asked to download a free app (available for Android and iPhone) to enhance the plot. Moviegoers are advised to leave their devices on their laps during the film. When additional content is available on the second screen, audience members are notified by their vibrating phones.
www.appdefilm.nl

App: The First Second Screen Film

Second screen comes to the movies with an app-enabled film, appropiately named APP.  The film is about a young psychology student Anna Rijnders who, after a dramatic accident in which her ​​younger brother has become partially paralyzed, goes completely into her own virtual world. 

Before going to see the film, moviegoers are asked to download a free app (available for Android and iPhone) to enhance the plot. Moviegoers are advised to leave their devices on their laps during the film. When additional content is available on the second screen, audience members are notified by their vibrating phones.

www.appdefilm.nl

Shazam For Clothes Identifies What TV Characters Are Wearing - PSFK

http://www.psfk.com/2013/04/shazam-clothing-identification-tv-shows.html

CEO Andrew Fisher told The Guardian: We have the ability to identify the product in a TV show so that when somebody Shazams it, they could find out where a presenter’s dress is from in one click.

No big surprise. I predicted this — as did oters — and wrote about it in Social TV and the Second Screen, last year.

screengeek:

85% of smartphone users reported second screen-linked behavior at least once a month, over 60% reported doing it on a weekly basis, and 39% did so daily. Over 80% of 18- to 24-year-olds told Pew they used their phone while watching TV, and 60% of Americans with annual incomes above $50,000 use their phones while watching TV.Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/bii-report-why-the-second-screen-industry-is-set-to-explode-2013-2#ixzz2MQvo3Wdn

screengeek:

85% of smartphone users reported second screen-linked behavior at least once a month, over 60% reported doing it on a weekly basis, and 39% did so daily. Over 80% of 18- to 24-year-olds told Pew they used their phone while watching TV, and 60% of Americans with annual incomes above $50,000 use their phones while watching TV.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/bii-report-why-the-second-screen-industry-is-set-to-explode-2013-2#ixzz2MQvo3Wdn

(via designersofthings)

kdnewman:

Visual SyncAR breaks the fourth wall, brings TV content into your living room

Visual SyncAR, from NTT, uses digital watermarks embedded in the video stream to display synchronized content on a second screen. The screen area and playback timing is quickly detected, allowing for CG overlays and contextual information to be displayed with precision.

(by Diginfonews)

I predicted this technology last year in the Social TV and the Second Screen report.

(via kdnewman)

Nielsen’s new Connected Devices study is out:

Social Media — 44% of 18-24 year olds and close to 50% of 25-34 year olds are visiting social networking sites on their smartphones during both commercials and programs while watching TV.
Seeking Information — 36% of people 35-54 and 44% of people 55-64 use their tablets to dive deeper into the TV program they are currently watching.

So the older folks are relying on search to make their experience of TV richer, while the youths are relying on each other.

Nielsen’s new Connected Devices study is out:

  • Social Media — 44% of 18-24 year olds and close to 50% of 25-34 year olds are visiting social networking sites on their smartphones during both commercials and programs while watching TV.
  • Seeking Information — 36% of people 35-54 and 44% of people 55-64 use their tablets to dive deeper into the TV program they are currently watching.

So the older folks are relying on search to make their experience of TV richer, while the youths are relying on each other.

Ericsson has released a new report showing the rapidly changing complexion of TV use. Social media is growing like mad, and although Ericsson downplays it, an additional 7% in cord cutting since 2011 is like a tire iron coming through the windshield.

[And I wish they would stop talking about TV ‘consumption’. No one is consuming anything. Let’s just call it TV use.]

Forget Cord-Cutters: Cable Companies Should Worry About Cord-Nevers - Rebecca Greenfield via The Atlantic Wire

http://www.theatlanticwire.com/technology/2012/08/forget-cord-cutters-cable-companies-should-worry-about-cord-nevers/55380/

Rebecca Greenfield collates a bunch of commentary about the slowing growth — almost non-growth — of TV subscriptions in the US. Around 400,000 Americans cut the cord last quarter, but cord-cutters aren’t the trend to watch: it’s cord-nevers.

Rebecca Greenfield via the Atlantic Wire

Cord-never numbers are particularly hard to measure. A cable company, of course, can’t report the amount of people who never subscribed to them in the first place, but we can do some piecing together to get an idea of the changing trends. U.S. census data found that 1.8 million new households were formed, but that only 16.9 percent of those signed up for pay-TV services, according to Ad Age’s Dan Hirschorn. The TV industry has been flat for years; U.S. households continue to rise. Meanwhile, as cable subscription rates have stayed flat, Internet subscriptions are on the rise. Comcast added 156,000 net broadband subscribers, an 8.4% increase; Time Warner added 59,000 residential high-speed Internet subscribers. While something like 100 million U.S. households subscribe to TV services, the U.S. 2010 census data had 120 million households with Internet — those numbers have only risen since then, with these companies reporting increased subscriptions. And what do people do on the Internet? Watch things. Though the most popular Internet activity, as of 2010, was social networking, video saw a 12 percent increase, according to a Neilsen report. Though, those numbers include people with cable.

These cord-never numbers matter more than the cable-cutters because the people who tend to not ever sign up for cable are young — and the youth is the future. Americans ages 12 to 34 are spending less time in front of the TV, found another Neilsen study. As of February 2012, for three quarters in a row, there have been declines in viewing among Americans under 35, The New York Times’ Brian Stelter reports. He attributes this decline to a shift to streaming. “Young people are still watching the same shows, but they are streaming them on computers and phones,” he writes. Right now the cable industry has maintained stable subscription rates because of an elderly population that’s watching television more, adds Stelter. But, those people won’t be around to change the future. The broke twenty-somethings who survive off of Hulu, Netflix, bootleg streams of their favorite shows, and stealing each others’ HBO Go passwords now, might get used to a life without paying for cable, causing a generational shift in the way Americans consume things. That’s what the cable companies should worry about. 

And some people are simply watching less of the mass-marketing oriented Hollywood mumbo jumbo, and doing other things. 

I expect a revolution in what we call TV, and it will emerge from the rise of the second screen, and the separation of advertising revenue from broadcasting (see Social TV and The Second Screen). Imagine if Twitter built a variant of its tool that was geared to a richer social experience around TV. And imagine that millions of people watching the NBA playoffs are using that app to socially experience the playoffs, running the game on the dumb box in the corner and the Twitter app on the iPad or iPhone or laptop. And imagine that Nike decides to pay Twitter for ads on the second screen. How will the NBA or ESPN respond? What law is being broken?

This is like cord-cutting, metaphorically. It’s cutting the link between advertising dollars and the ‘owners’ of the TV products.

So the revolution comes when the networks and the cable companies loose a large slice of their ad revenues. It will be just like the newspapers losing the classified business to Craigslist. 

On the other side of that collapse will be new TV, but first it will all fall to bits. And then I will finally be able to buy access to a single NBA playoff game, or just the Women’s Beach Volley Ball at the Olympics, or just Game Of Thrones from HBO, because the natural unit of TV is a show, an episode, a game, just like the natural unit of music is a song, as iTunes proved.

What Are People Doing On The Second Screen?

There’s a torrent of new research coming out about the second screen, and how rapidly we are moving from Old TV to New TV, as I detailed in the recent Social TV And The Second Screen report.

The numbers of people second screening is rising quickly, as shown in this eMarketer study:

Consumers Create Own Social TV Experiences - eMarketer

The study also found that around 41% of respondents were interested in or were already using websites and apps that allowed them to chat with others about TV shows. Of those respondents, 56% said that, if their favorite TV show launched a social TV app, they would be interested in a chat function directly through that app, while 53% would prefer to use Facebook chat. Half of respondents would use text messaging or group texting and 38% said they would use Skype to discuss that TV show.

Looking at when viewers are participating in these social TV activities, it depends on the type of content or activity. Checking in to a show, through an app such as GetGlue, generally happens before or during a show, while searching for extra information or playing games most often takes place during ad breaks or after the show.

This write up never mentions Twitter, which seems a strange omission.

(via worktalkresearch)

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...