Install Theme

Posts tagged with ‘planning’

Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth.

Mike Tyson

Tidemark’s cloud-based analytics includes Storylines, an infographic-style display of various scenarios using company data and assumptions. Looks very cool. Read this Quentin Hardy piece that mentions them.

Tidemark’s cloud-based analytics includes Storylines, an infographic-style display of various scenarios using company data and assumptions. Looks very cool. Read this Quentin Hardy piece that mentions them.

Complexity theorists tend to ascribe to Popper’s (1957) notion that the future is fundamentally unpredictable or at least unknowable for non-trivial systems of interest—in our case human systems—and broadly speaking, the longer the time scale for prediction, the less predictable the outcome. This makes cities— which are about as long term as physical products can get—intrinsically unpredictable. So a future city cannot simply be the built-out product of a creator’s imagination, in the way a building can be. Nor is a city growing like an organism: there is no knowable optimal form of target organism to be steered towards. The idea of the planned city as a knowable utopia is a chimera. Nevertheless, we continue to try to plan in the belief that the world will be a better place if we intervene to identify and solve issues that are widely regarded as problematic. But this must be tempered with an awareness of the limitations of planning, not least through an awareness of the evolutionary nature of urban change.(Marshall 2009:266)

Michael Batty and Stephen Marshall, The Origins of Complexity Theory in Cities and Planning in Complexity Theories of Cities Have Come of Age (2012) Springer

'The idea of the planned city as a knowable utopia is a chimera.'

(via gordonr)

climateadaptation:

Urban Renewal
These 10 global infrastructure and tech companies are among the early leaders in smart-city programs.
“Like Siemens and ABB, most of the beneficiaries of urbanization will  be infrastructure and technology outfits that provide or utilize  smartphones, sensors and software and services to track the use of a  city’s assets and commit resources when and where they’re needed. Cloud  technology, which can cut costs while boosting computing capacity, will  play a big role. Even social media will participate, as cities multiply  the ways a citizen can spot a problem–anything from a water-main break  to a traffic snarl–and then alert others to avoid it or do something  about it.
Technology researchers at IDC estimate  the size of the smart-city information-technology market is now $34  billion annually and will gain 18%-plus a year to $57 billion by 2014.  That’s not a huge amount to global giants, but certainly enough to help  drive growth. (The companies don’t break out earnings related to these  projects.) The market has broadened to include items like broadband  connectivity, green belts, renewable energy, green buildings and other  intelligent-city systems. “You are talking about smart water, smart  transportation, better public safety,” says Jennifer Bélissent, a  consultant at Forrester.”
Source: Barron’s “Dawn of the Smart City”

Related articles
"The bias lurking behind every large-scale smart city is a belief that bottom-up complexity can be…" (underpaidgenius.com)
Those Pesky Humans: Urban Planning and its Discontents (blogcritics.org)
Why The U.S. Government Should Embrace Smart Cities (fastcompany.com)

climateadaptation:

Urban Renewal

These 10 global infrastructure and tech companies are among the early leaders in smart-city programs.

“Like Siemens and ABB, most of the beneficiaries of urbanization will be infrastructure and technology outfits that provide or utilize smartphones, sensors and software and services to track the use of a city’s assets and commit resources when and where they’re needed. Cloud technology, which can cut costs while boosting computing capacity, will play a big role. Even social media will participate, as cities multiply the ways a citizen can spot a problem–anything from a water-main break to a traffic snarl–and then alert others to avoid it or do something about it.

Technology researchers at IDC estimate the size of the smart-city information-technology market is now $34 billion annually and will gain 18%-plus a year to $57 billion by 2014. That’s not a huge amount to global giants, but certainly enough to help drive growth. (The companies don’t break out earnings related to these projects.) The market has broadened to include items like broadband connectivity, green belts, renewable energy, green buildings and other intelligent-city systems. “You are talking about smart water, smart transportation, better public safety,” says Jennifer Bélissent, a consultant at Forrester.”

Source: Barron’s “Dawn of the Smart City”

(via thenextweb)


Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...