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Posts tagged with ‘nyc’

The NY Times Is ‘Playing Close To The Basket’

The NY Times has launched a NYC-based incubator for startups. They are not demanding equity, but they want to stay close to the action so they are well-positioned to invest in promising startups as they raise funds.

TimeSpace - The New York Times

What

timeSpace is a new initiative from The New York Times that brings entrepreneurs to our headquarters to refine and grow their businesses. Over four months, you and your team will work out of 620 8th Avenue, meet with relevant Times staff, demo your product and teach/learn alongside entrepreneurs and employees who make their livings in digital media, technology and journalism.

Why

It is simple: The New York Times, and media in general, are in the midst of unprecedented change. Our core purpose remains to enhance society by creating, collecting and distributing high-quality news and information. We want to push ourselves and push others to find the best ways to do so, and we believe that timeSpace can be a part of that process.

This is a great example of the sorts of partnerships and interactions that animate the NYC tech scene compared to San Francisco. NYC is filled with other scenes — media, performing and figurative arts, music, finance, and so on — while San Francisco is dominated by tech and the immediate supporters: investors, PR firms, legal, etc. 

I’ve often felt that much of the criticism of the Trade Center has been under-laid with a form of anti-urban bias, one that is not prone to appreciate the densities and diversities of Manhattan. In my mind, urban concentration and New York are very much here to stay, and our task is to enhance and to celebrate those facts, making the most of the urban condition and the urban opportunity.

Minoru Yamasaki (via bentleyhacker)

Post-Sandy: What Is The Future Of Urban Development In NYC?

What sort of changes in planning should we expect for New York City following Hurricane Sandy? Buildings with higher foundations, electrical systems moved from the basement to above the first floor, and watertight first floor doorways. But no retreat from the water’s edge is likely, in the near term.

New York Reassessing Building Code to Limit Storm Damage - Mireya Navarro

Some architects and building experts say the city should widen its efforts to plant more wetlands and parks that can serve as natural buffers to floods. “All the little blades of grass actually makes the flow of the water lower,” said Susannah C. Drake, associate director of the Cooper Union Institute for Sustainable Design and the principal architect at dlandstudio.

image

dladnstudio and ARO exhibition: New Urban Ground

What does not seem to be getting consideration, at least for now, is banning development altogether in the city’s flood zones, humble or affluent.

“This is not a viable policy option in New York City, and to be honest, nor is it in any other major coastal city I’ve been working,” said Jeroen Aerts, a water risk expert from the Free University in Amsterdam who has been hired by the mayor’s office to assess flood protections. “The stakes of developers and general economic activities in the waterfront are too high.”

In Mr. Aerts’s view, the most realistic options for New York are to build levees and surge barriers, and elevate and floodproof buildings.

Ms. Quinn, a likely candidate for mayor when Mr. Bloomberg’s term expires at the end of 2013, said changes in the building code were a far higher priority than rethinking zoning rules. But she said that nothing was off the table.

“I don’t think there’s anything that’s taboo to discuss at this point,” she said.

We’ll see what happens after the next storm leads to $30B in damages.

(via underpaidgenius)

40% of our thefts are Apple products

NYC Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, quoted in Aspen, Colorado (via benedictevans)

(Source: twitter.com, via benedictevans)

nycopendata:

Yesterday, Mayor Bloomberg signed into law what he termed “the most ambitious and comprehensive open data legislation in the country.”The Mayor remarked:“If we’re going to continue leading the country in innovation and transparency, we’re going to have to make sure that all New Yorkers have access to the data that drives our City. Across City government, agencies use data to develop policy, implement programs, and track performance — and each month, our Administration shares more and more of this data with the public at large, catalyzing the creativity, intellect, and enterprising spirit of computer programmers to build tools that help us all improve our lives.”
Read more on NYC.gov 

This is great news, and will lead to unexpected innovation.

nycopendata:

Yesterday, Mayor Bloomberg signed into law what he termed “the most ambitious and comprehensive open data legislation in the country.”

The Mayor remarked:
“If we’re going to continue leading the country in innovation and transparency, we’re going to have to make sure that all New Yorkers have access to the data that drives our City. Across City government, agencies use data to develop policy, implement programs, and track performance — and each month, our Administration shares more and more of this data with the public at large, catalyzing the creativity, intellect, and enterprising spirit of computer programmers to build tools that help us all improve our lives.”

Read more on NYC.gov 

This is great news, and will lead to unexpected innovation.

(via fred-wilson)

Between 2005 and 2010 employment in New York’s high-tech sector grew by nearly 30%. Google alone has about 1,200 engineers in the city.

What To Stop Doing

Jim Collins, Best New Year’s Resolution?

Suppose you woke up tomorrow and received two phone calls. The first phone call tells you that you have inherited $20 million, no strings attached. The second tells you that you have an incurable and terminal disease, and you have no more than 10 years to live. What would you do differently, and, in particular, what would you stop doing?

I had a subarachnoid aneurysm a few years ago, and at one point I was informed — erroneously — that my brain injury was inoperable. I had some time to reflect on that, and even after it was clear that surgery was, in fact, an option, the mortality stats on my condition were pretty harrowing, with at least 50% mortality, and given the severity of my situation, significantly higher.

Subarachnoid hemorrhage

I have changed a great deal since then. I started playing the guitar again, after about 20 years hiatus, for example. I’ve started writing music and poetry again. I drink a lot more champagne, too. Have to smell those roses.

But I still need to stop once in a while and ask: what should I stop doing?

This year, I intend to raise even greater barriers to long-distance travel, which is so costly in time and often so meager in payback.

I am involved in a foundational transition in my work, started last year. I am transitioning from a modality of acting as an advisor to companies (usually software start-ups), and investing more of my  my work-related efforts into various, well-defined research initiatives, often working cooperatively with other researchers. I will be saying more about these initiatives later this week, with more specific announcements.

The book that I have been talking about for the past few months (formerly called Liquid City) will be sewn into the new research agenda, and will be rolling out in pieces this year, in a slightly reconsidered form, and a new title (in process).

I have recommitted myself to connecting with the community here, in Beacon NY, my adopted home, and I am working to get a food cooperative off the ground. Most critically, my family is buying and moving into a new place here in the next week, and in the next few months we will be putting in a garden, fixing up the place, and settling in. Going to dedicate a lot to that.

I am working in NYC from the Grind coworking space, and I hope to be an active and involved member of that community, and the tech and innovation community of NYC, as well. This will all be keeping me relatively close to NYC, more local than I have been in decades.

I still plan to do 12-15 conferences in distant places, but I intend to keep to that number as a max, and the rewards — on some level or another — have to be pretty high to get me to go.

Say yes to some things, and no to most others. But I am open to discuss new ideas with people. I will be starting open office hours in February, after the move is over.

(via underpaidgenius)

Software heavyweight moves headquarters to Silicon Alley - NY Daily News →

New York City’s challenge to Silicon Valley’s high-tech dominance continues apace. By the time Mayor Bloomberg’s brainchild of an applied sciences campus takes root in 2013, the momentum may be too great to stop.

Latest case in point: Infor, the world’s third-largest creator of manufacturing software, is moving its headquarters from Atlanta to the Flatiron neighborhood of Manhattan — joining Google, Facebook, Twitter and other leading-edge firms in establishing a major presence in the city.

CEO Charles Phillips says the prospect of the new engineering campus — the prize Stanford, Cornell and others are fiercely competing for — was a big part of the reason behind the relocation.

Another example of New York as a multicultural, multi-scene high tech hotbed, competing against the monocultural Bay Area.

(Source: underpaidgenius)

curiositycounts:

Mapping New York’s startup scene. Richard Florida has a great piece on why timing is right of NYC’s tech move as the new Silicon Valley.


related
"In 2010, Silicon Valley accounted for the lion’s share of venture-capital investment by far:…" (stoweboyd.com)

curiositycounts:

Mapping New York’s startup scene. Richard Florida has a great piece on why timing is right of NYC’s tech move as the new Silicon Valley.

(via underpaidgenius)


WATER WASTED:
More than 37,800 liters of  water is lost via leakage every minute as it flows through New York  State’s aqueducts into the city, according to IBM. The wall visualizes a  calculation of that volume of water corresponding to the volume of the  data wall. “Essentially we’re filling the wall with digital water,”  IBM’s Lee Green, vice president of brand experience and strategic  design, explains.

(via Sensors and the City: IBM Exhibit Visualizes Today’s Urban Problems—and Potential Solutions)

WATER WASTED:

More than 37,800 liters of water is lost via leakage every minute as it flows through New York State’s aqueducts into the city, according to IBM. The wall visualizes a calculation of that volume of water corresponding to the volume of the data wall. “Essentially we’re filling the wall with digital water,” IBM’s Lee Green, vice president of brand experience and strategic design, explains.

(via Sensors and the City: IBM Exhibit Visualizes Today’s Urban Problems—and Potential Solutions)