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Posts tagged with ‘brian solis’


Investment in headcount and infrastructure have steadily grown, as companies reach “intermediate” stages of social business. Several are turning their sights from “social media” as an extension of marketing and communications, and seek to push a “social business” agenda throughout the organization. Top findings include:
Most organizations are “intermediate,” with only 17% self-described as “strategic” in the execution of their social strategies.
78% of companies have a dedicated social media team, at the division, corporate or both levels 
Companies are committing more headcount to social media across all sizes of organizations. The biggest jump is for companies with more than 100,000 employees, which now report an average of 49 full-time employees supporting social media, compared to 20 in 2010.
85% of companies have an organizational social media policy, yet only 18% of companies report that their employees’ knowledge of social media usage and the organizational policy is either good or very good.
(via Charlene Li, The State of Social Business in 2013 | LinkedIn)

Investment in headcount and infrastructure have steadily grown, as companies reach “intermediate” stages of social business. Several are turning their sights from “social media” as an extension of marketing and communications, and seek to push a “social business” agenda throughout the organization. Top findings include:

  • Most organizations are “intermediate,” with only 17% self-described as “strategic” in the execution of their social strategies.
  • 78% of companies have a dedicated social media team, at the division, corporate or both levels 
  • Companies are committing more headcount to social media across all sizes of organizations. The biggest jump is for companies with more than 100,000 employees, which now report an average of 49 full-time employees supporting social media, compared to 20 in 2010.
  • 85% of companies have an organizational social media policy, yet only 18% of companies report that their employees’ knowledge of social media usage and the organizational policy is either good or very good.

(via Charlene Li, The State of Social Business in 2013 | LinkedIn)

(via ibmsocialbiz)

Socialogy: Interview with Brian Solis

Tweeting Brands

Brian Solis reports on the top brands mentioned on Twitter. Big surprise: #1 is…. (drumroll)…. Twitter!

The Top Brands on Twitter: April 2010


For more analysis, see Report: Top 20 Brands on Twitter – April 2010

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Web 2.0 Expo: Open web, content strategy, privacy/identity and of course, karaoke

[This is a guest post by Deanna Zandt, author of the forthcoming Share This! How You Will Change the World with Social Networking.]

Web 2.0 Expo wrapped up in San Francisco on Thursday last week (see my coverage of the opening days with this post), and while the depth I was longing for still never quite manifested, breadth of topics were aplenty. Keynotes covered everything from culture shifting with Clara Shih’s talk on “The Facebook Era," where she noted that social capital is strongest and most important at the fringes of our social graphs, to hardcore nerdery with Stewart Butterfield and Cal Henderson presenting "A Web Nerd’s Approach to Building a Massively-Multiplayer Game.

Then there was the man himself, Tim O’Reilly, giving his 2010 salvo on the state of the Internet operating system. Perhaps most important from his keynote was how strongly he came out against data silos and social graphs as walled gardens. Referencing his 2005 paper on what comprises web 2.0, he said,

"You own your own data" was one of the core pieces of positioning. I think this one of the areas where I was wrong, because I think we’re seeing that we’re being increasing owned by big providers, and I’m not sure that’s the way we want it to go.

O’Reilly went on to push back on the idea that developing on someone’s platform means that they own that work, data or service. “It’s crunch time,” he said. “It’s time to start thinking hard about keeping the web open. Don’t take the open web for granted.” Especially poignant as we see more and more people grumbling and leaving Facebook for reasons that fall under this umbrella.

Speaking of privacy, ahem, there was a fine workshop geared toward entrepreneurs on how to avoid the pitfalls of #privacyFAIL. Based on the primer by the California ACLU, “Promoting Privacy and Free Speech is Good for Business," and populated by a lawyer, an ACLUer, an entrepreneur, and a VC, the panel offered a variety of case studies (many of which can be found in the primer) showing the do’s and don’ts of this part of business. I nearly "hallelujah’ed" when Lauren Gelman ranted a bit about how unreadable privacy statements and TOS’es are, and why this needs to change immediately.

Other workshops that caught my eye were:

Of course, get-togethers and parties are half the conference fun, and I do want to give Bing big ups for the great TechKaraoke night we had on Tuesday at Jillian’s. The excellent KJ — that’s karaoke jockey— Roger Niner carried us through a fierce competition, and despite the fact that even though no one sang “Sister Christian" yet it became stuck in my head for days, it was still one of the highlights for me. Also fabulous was the book party for Brian Solis' “Engage,” where a beautiful view atop the Marriott and good friends created an intimate and spirited atmosphere.

See you next Expo!

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The Social Media Press Release: What Is It And Why You May Need It

So now I am a “social media maverick”… Hmmm. Maybe that’s pretty close. But the show notes make me sound like a prick. Maybe Spininfluencer’s Eric Schwartzman doesn’t like me much.

[from Spinfluencer: On the Record…Online with Social Media Maverick Stowe Boyd]

SHOW NOTES:

04:40 - Boyd sounds off on the new ethics of the blogoshere and how he ruffled feathers of blogging giant Shel Holtz.

[stowe: ‘sounds off’? Hmmm. I thought I was just answering a question.]

07:10 - Will PR professionals relinquish control and join the conversation?

09:22 - Boyd on the nature of consensual blogs.

15:27 - Boyd opines on the most effective use of social media and it’s [sic — why can’t writers get this right. “it’s” is the contraction for “it is” and “its” is the possessive.] relation to the broadcast model.

16:47 - Boyd slams the social media press release as an antiquated notion, a holdover from the days of the telegraph and offers ways in which to enter the 21st century.

[stowe: Slams?]

19:58 - Schwartzman and Boyd debate the validity of the press release as a means to distribute information. Boyd ridicules companies who ignore technological trends.

25:56 - Thinking outside the box: new tactics for a new era of media.

28:30 - What are the key ways in which companies can abide by the ethics of new media?

30:26 - Boyd discusses the nature of authority vs. integrity in both traditional media and in the blogosphere.

33:33 - Facing a moral dilemma: how PR professionals should behave in the blogosphere when their livelihood depends on the promotion of a person or product.

36:40 - Boyd on why he is legitimate and relevant.

[stowe: as an example of how blogging legitimacy is gained.]

37:07 - Plugging the Boyd’s upcoming keynote speech at the 2007 PR Online Convergence Confererence titled “Bloggers and PR: Why Can’t We Just Get Along.”

[stowe: “the Boyd’s upcoming keynote”? I don’t think I deserve a definite article.]

38:31 - End.

I expect the same sort of pushback at the PR Online Convergence conference, where I am keynoting. There seem to be so few PR folks that get it. An interview with Brian Solis of PR 2.0 would be so different, and so much better, I think. I am going to have Brian on /Talkshow soon, and we’ll see.

Five ways mobile changes the world. Forever.

Brian Solis has a great wrap-up of a developing (and inevitable) collision between Twitter, the reigning social presence flow app, and Jaiku, it’s less well-known but worthy competititor. Leo Laporte’s now well-known defection to Jaiku from Twitter has led to a lot of folks checking Jaiku out for the first time. Solis characterizes the impact of that break this way:

[from Twitter Me This, Is Jaiku a Threat? Let’s Ask Those Defining the Landscape]

[…]

Now, there is a line in the sand. A division between Twitter and Jaiku. No one thinks that two can survive, that this tournament of arm wrestling will divide the community.

However, I don’t think so.

Both offer points of value that will appeal to different market segments (left and right) as well as those who can enjoy playing both sides of the fence (the middle).

[…]

Back in December I joined Jaiku to test it out and I had this to say:

[from Jaiku by Stowe Boyd]

Basically, you are pushing out status messages to a list of buddies (and the whole damn world, if you want to) like Twitter, including by texting on your cell. The added wrinkle is that Jaiku allows you to add RSS feeds from your blogs, Flickr, and del.icio.us accounts, so that Jaiku becomes the pulsing bloodstream of your online identity.

I returned to Jaiku again in March, after I had become a confirmed Twitterholic:

[from Trying Jaiku As A Better Lifestream]

I was fiddling with Facebook today, to see if it could be tweaked into being a better single stream for all my traffic, and I managed to crash Firefox by putting Technorati tags into a Facebook ‘share’. I have decided to continue using del.icio.us bookmarks because I can tag them, even though they feel awfully static.

The answer might be to add more streams to Jaiku. I have included my Last.fm recently played stream, the Ambivalence feed, and I have the nice folks there trying to figure out why Upcoming.org RSS feeds don’t work (missing the ‘.xml’ suffix?). I already had Twitter and Flickr streams there.

One nice thing about Jaiku: comments are possible on all stream items. Look at this screenshot, based on an interchange with Petteri Koponen of Jaiku. Note that the initial start was a Twitter that was streamed into Jaiku.

This comment notion is great, and provides an interest new dimension to social presence flow. In Twitter, we do something similar by direct messages to others, or via a ‘shout out’ into the stream by writing a message with an ‘@’ preceding a person’s name: “@ briansolis - nice post”. [Note that the latter spontaneously occured on Twitter, invented by some savvy user. It’s not a supported feature.]

But in Jaiku, comments get added to the initial message: a neater solution.

Also, Jaiku has the flavor of a tumbler blog as well. Various flavors of elements in the stream are denoted with different icons. Any sort of RSS feeds can be flowed into the traffic, and passed along to your downstream buddies. In this way, it actually feels much more like a Facebook profile page than Twitter.

Both Twitter and jaiku are mobile, although at the moment Jaiku is only supported natively on S60 phones. Jaiku’s ambitions with mobile seem more advanced than Twitter, involving a sophisticated client on the phone that supports presence and messaging. Twitter is limited to SMS, at the moment.

So, is this the final bout for supremacy in social presence flow apps? I don’t thinks so. It’s early days yet, and the apps are rudimentary at the moment. I think we will see a lot of innovation, as well as efforts by the majors to get involved — either by acquisition or by their own efforts.


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