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Showing 36 posts tagged TV

Americans Now Spend More Time on Digital Devices Than on TV | Digital - Advertising Age

http://adage.com/article/digital/americans-spend-time-digital-devices-tv/243414/?utm_source=feedly

via

American adults this year will for the first time spend more time each day using digital media than watching TV, according to a new report by eMarketer.

Adults in the U.S. are averaging five hours and nine minutes daily with digital media, up from four hours and 31 minutes last year and three hours and 50 minutes in 2011. The amount of time they spend watching TV has essentially stayed flat in that time period. It was pegged at four hours and 31 minutes this year, down slightly from four hours and 38 minutes in 2012.

Overall, the amount of time spent consuming media in all its forms — digital, TV, radio and print — is cranking ever upward, though radio and print are dropping off, according to eMarketer. U.S. adults are spending an average of 11 hours and 52 minutes every day with media, up 13 minutes from last year.

The surge in digital consumption has predictably been driven by mobile. U.S. adults now spend an average of two hours and 21 minutes per day using their mobile devices for activities other than phone calls, up 46 minutes from last year.

We know that you are fighting over lucre, not our inalienable rights as cable consumers. Pretending that you are fighting on our behalf rather than in the interests of your shareholders and executives is infantilizing and unbecoming. CBS is coming off another record year, Time Warner Cable’s stock is storming along, and the fight over retransmission fees is about how the pie is sliced, nothing more.

We have all grown used to the respective parties turning programming on and off as the negotiating table requires, but your bombast is tired, your motives are transparent and it’s clear that the public dimensions of this business conflict are far down the list of priorities.

Writing in the comments section accompanying the news in The New York Times, one reader spoke for many of us:

“These games of chicken are depressingly common among cable companies and networks across the country — made all the more obnoxious by the marketing spin from both sides intended directed at customers they assume to be economic illiterates. They are nothing more than battles between media behemoths over who can stick their hands deeper into the pockets of the remaining viewers beholden to their dying business models.”

So, as you were, guys. Continue to bash in each other’s heads all you want. Just don’t pretend this is a noble crusade for the consumer.

David Carr, Self-Serving War of Words by 2 Giants in Television

I think the Google TV team have a huge opportunity with the new Chromecast device. Despite all of the previous awful efforts at Google to get into the living room, Chromecast is really different. It’s simple — a wireless dongle that plugs into the back of the TV, no wires, and a wireless connection to the internet that allows control of the TV as a video streaming device from smartphones, tablets, and PCs. It especially does not require a remote.

Google has blindsided Apple with what I think will be the TV device of the decade.

warrenellis:

(via As TV Falls Apart, Tumblr And Twitter Aim To Pick Up The Pieces | TechCrunch)

Draw that line out to the dead cat bounce around 5 years from now. ‘Premium’ content on ‘TV’ will be worth zero. TV is about to go through the hell that newspapers have already seen: the collapse of their business model, and the migration of the people formerly known as the audience.

warrenellis:

(via As TV Falls Apart, Tumblr And Twitter Aim To Pick Up The Pieces | TechCrunch)

Draw that line out to the dead cat bounce around 5 years from now. ‘Premium’ content on ‘TV’ will be worth zero. TV is about to go through the hell that newspapers have already seen: the collapse of their business model, and the migration of the people formerly known as the audience.

Nick Bilton, What Does a Tablet Do to the Child’s Mind?

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/03/31/disruptions-what-does-a-tablet-do-to-the-childs-mind/?ref=todayspaper
Nick Bilton, What Does a Tablet Do to the Child’s Mind?

A report published last week by the Millennium Cohort Study, a long-term study group in Britain that has been following 19,000 children born in 2000 and 2001, found that those who watched more than three hours of television, videos or DVDs a day had a higher chance of conduct problems, emotional symptoms and relationship problems by the time they were 7 than children who did not. The study, of a sample of 11,000 children, found that children who played video games — often age-appropriate games — for the same amount of time did not show any signs of negative behavioral changes by the same age.

TV appears to be bad for kids in large doses, but video games are not.

I’m A Snob

I am unfollowing people who post (too much) stuff about TV series. Maybe there’s a place for that, but I continue to feel TV is junk, a medium dominated by sentimentality and bourgeois platitudes. 

Apologies to all that I offend. Isn’t there a movie to watch or a book to read?

1B Tablets Projected To Ship In Next 5 Years

U.S. Consumer Tablet On-device Spending Soars with 22% of Users Spending More Than $50 per Month

At the close of 2012, market intelligence firm ABI Research estimates nearly 200 million tablets will have shipped worldwide since 2009 and an additional 1 billion tablets are forecasted to ship over the next 5 years.

That’s 200 million tablets per year for the next five, which is the number that have sold to date.

It’s hard to minimize the impact of this transition. Tablets are proximal devices, like smartphones and to a lesser extent the ultralight laptops (like my Air). These are devices that we carry around with us, always within reach, the first recourse when we need to catch up, look up, or pay up. Desktop PCs seem as distant in use patterns as going to the library: the desktop PC is upstairs, or in another room. Once you buy a tablet, the desktop’s gathering dust, and then a year later you donate it to a charity to get the space back on your desk.

In less than five years, individual ownership of desktop devices will fall to near zero, and even niches like gaming and video production will transition to tablets.

The impacts of this transition will be profound. One implication: as more people transition to tablets with built-in data connectivity and as phone companies roll out more capable wireless solutions, we will start to see a turning away from cable to the home: not just for TV, but for internet. People will always have their connectivity with them. And instead of a cable bringing internet to your living room, users will wirelessly stream TV, video, and movies from their tablets to the display on the wall.

Notably, the cable companies seem oblivious to this transition, and I’m not even certain how many of the tablet manufacturers see it.

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